Now listen, all you really need for a fishing trip is a rudimentary fishing pole, a hook, and some bait. But there’s a lot of gear out there that not only helps kids get the hang of fishing but also make the experience one that kids are going to want to repeat. You never know, it might even give them more luck on the water. Here, then, are eight pieces of fishing gear for kids. Are all of the items necessary? No. But they’re all useful, affordable, and can help lure kids into the age-old pastime

With our huge selection of fishing gear, Cheaper Than Dirt! is sure to be able to outfit you for that dream fishing trip or a short jaunt down to the neighborhood pond. We have a full selection of baits, tackle, rods, reels, line, and even waders. We have the same equipment in stock that the pros use and the fishing clothing to make you look like one as well!


Your purchase also includes a reel and fishing line. A thumb button extension on the reel helps to make casting easier, while the aluminum spool is compatible with nylon or braid. The instant anti-reverse bearing prevents fish from gaining slack and escaping if your child forgets to sink the hook immediately, resulting in fewer lost catches and more fun on the water. Before you head to your nearest lake, make time to work on your casting together using the included fish-shaped practice plug.
What You Should Look For:  Whether you’re big-game bonefishing in the Bahamas or trolling for crappie in Wisconsin, you’ll need a pair of fishing pliers to save you a whole lot of grief when unhooking catches and they also come in handy for securing hooks to tighten knots and to cut lines. Go for pliers that fit nicely in the palm of your hands with jaws suitable for both fresh and saltwater usage.
Leaders are either monafilament or wire that is more abrasion-resistant and heavier than fishing line alone. The leader connects the end of the line to the bait and hook. It's used to protect your fishing line and help prevent it from breaking -- or being bitten in half -- while you reel in larger fish. A leader is not always necessary, and it typically is used only when there is concern that a fish will create enough force to snap your line.
The bad news is that all together this kit still costs a pretty penny. The good news is that you don’t need to get it all right now. If money is an issue, start out with the absolute essentials: rod, reel, fly line, leaders, tippet and flies. In the summer on smaller streams, you can always wade wet (it’s pretty refreshing, actually); a vest should be next on your list, but you can get by without it as long as you stay simple; a hat and polarized sunglasses can wait a payday or two.
Lots of people are turned off of fly fishing by a few glances at ugly price tags, but there’s plenty of accessibility to be had. A good many of us got around the up-front expenses buying an all-in-one package or kit, but while some nice ones do exist, there are also loads of “outfits” that package shoddy products; in our experience, those will simply add to your beginner’s frustrations.
Leaders are either monafilament or wire that is more abrasion-resistant and heavier than fishing line alone. The leader connects the end of the line to the bait and hook. It's used to protect your fishing line and help prevent it from breaking -- or being bitten in half -- while you reel in larger fish. A leader is not always necessary, and it typically is used only when there is concern that a fish will create enough force to snap your line.

One of my oldest childhood memories is sitting out on a dock at the lake with my dad digging out a slimy worm from a muck-filled Styrofoam cup crawling with red wrigglers. Following a quick lesson on baiting a hook, I carefully impaled a worm and casted. Maybe 20 minutes later my rod bowed and my line began to pour off the reel. An epic tug-of-war between boy and gill-breathing pond creature ensued and roughly 20 seconds later I pulled up a bony sunfish. It was all of six inches, but to my eyes, it might as well have been a scale-tipping blue marlin. I succeeded because my dad was patient and clear. But also because he equipped me with the right kids fishing gear.
Bobbers, or floaters as they’re sometimes called, help you know when you’re getting bites from a fish. When a fish bites, the bobber sinks. As soon as that happens, you know you’re ready to reel your catch in. Again, you have some choices when it comes to bobbers. The bobbers most people are familiar with are the round red and white plastic ones. The round bobbers are nice because you just have to clip them to the line in order to attach them. However, the round bobber does limit how deep you can cast a line.
Choosing the right rod for you should depend on the kind of fishing you’re going to do. If you’re just starting out, use a rod with medium strength so that you can angle different kinds of fish, and enough responsiveness so you can easily feel when the fish bite—allowing you to quickly reel it out of the water. The ideal length of a rod should be around 11.8 inches (30 centimeters) longer than your height.
Encouraging youth fishing entails outfitting them with good kids fishing tackle and gear. Low-quality tackle that performs poorly or is difficult to use will only discourage them from hitting the water. Fortunately, the fishing world is flush with fine products perfect for furthering young anglers' careers. From rods and reels to tackle storage, eyewear, and electronics, you'll find items of interest to up-and-comers of all ages.
If you plan to fish by the shore, small tackle boxes that can fit in your bag may be enough. When bank fishing, just bring one small tackle box as it would be easier to carry than having to drag around a large one. You’ll likely need to update your box with the appropriate fishing tackles for each of your trips in order to be able to bring a small box.

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Other devices which are widely used as bite indicators are floats which float in the water, and dart about if a fish bites, and quiver tips which are mounted onto the tip of the fishing rod. Bite alarms are electronic devices which bleep when a fish tugs a fishing line. Whereas floats and quiver tips are used as visual bite detectors, bite alarms are audible bite detectors.
Matching the right rod and reel to the lure or fishing technique, and knowing what line type and size works best sounds complicated, but it's actually basic common sense and logic. If you match these tools properly you can cast faster and better and even the more experienced angler can be more comfortable fishing, more accurate at casting and make your time on the water more enjoyable.
Important parameters of a fishing line are its breaking strength and its diameter (thicker, sturdier lines are more visible to fish). Factors that may determine what line an angler chooses for a given fishing environment include breaking strength, diameter,castability, buoyancy, stretch, color, knot strength, UV resistance, limpness, abrasion resistance, and visibility.

Hopefully you won’t have any major medical emergencies while you’re fishing. But small injuries are likely to happen, like getting a hook caught in your thumb or falling down and getting scraped up. For these sorts of things, it’s good to have a small first aid kit on hand. It doesn’t have to be fancy. Just throw in some band-aids, Neosporin, a few small bandages, and some waterproof medical tape. That should take care of most fishing-related injuries.
One of my oldest childhood memories is sitting out on a dock at the lake with my dad digging out a slimy worm from a muck-filled Styrofoam cup crawling with red wrigglers. Following a quick lesson on baiting a hook, I carefully impaled a worm and casted. Maybe 20 minutes later my rod bowed and my line began to pour off the reel. An epic tug-of-war between boy and gill-breathing pond creature ensued and roughly 20 seconds later I pulled up a bony sunfish. It was all of six inches, but to my eyes, it might as well have been a scale-tipping blue marlin. I succeeded because my dad was patient and clear. But also because he equipped me with the right kids fishing gear.

…Some quality wading boots. Simms’ Vibram wading boots are a tough, comfortable and safe option. They’re bombproof thanks to abrasion-resistant panels, and rubber treads paired with metal lugs give you grip on the slimiest of streambeds. What’s more, “cleanstream” technology keeps “hitch-hiking” organisms, which can latch onto your gear and find their way to non-native environments, causing some severe damage to ecosystems, from crashing your favorite stream’s party.
Harpoons are spears which have a barb at the end. Their use was widespread in palaeolithic times.[11] Cosquer cave in Southern France contains cave art over 16,000 years old, including drawings of seals which appear to have been harpooned. Tridents are spears which have three prongs at the business end. They are also called leisters or gigs. They feature widely in early mythology and history.
Speaking of safety, one last thing you absolutely shouldn’t forget is extra protection for your skin. Even if you’re well-covered by clothing, slather or spray on a sun-protectant formula—like the Sun Bum SPF 70 Continuous Spray Sunscreen 6 fl. oz ($15.99)—on all exposed skin areas, especially if you’re going to be fishing out in the sun all day. Make sure your sunscreen tube is small so it can fit in your tackle box and you’ll be reminded to put it on whenever you head out to fish.
Stock your tackle box with a variety of hooks so you’re ready for any sort of fish. I like to stick with the traditional J-hook, but many fishermen swear by the french hook. No matter what type of hook you carry, make sure you have them in different sizes. You don’t want to fish for river trout using a hook that’s sized for a 120-pound catfish. Sizes range from the very smallest at a number 32, to the very largest at 19/0.

A fishing line is a cord used or made for fishing. The earliest fishing lines were made from leaves or plant stalk (Parker 2002). Later lines were constructed from horse hair or silk thread, with catgut leaders. From the 1850s, modern industrial machinery was employed to fashion fishing lines in quantity. Most of these lines were made from linen or silk, and more rarely cotton.[3]

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