Pat, I think many people don’t realize that LL Bean is more than a clothing manufacturer and they actually make some pretty decent fly fishing gear. My first fly rod was made by Eddie Bauer, before all they did was make clothes. Good that your origins got you off on the right foot into a hopeless career of fly fishing! Hard to believe you’ve only been fishing for a year 😉

Today’s kids have a selection of quality offerings specifically geared toward the younger angler. Something shorter than the “standard” 9 footer can make a rod more manageable in the hands of a child, and a medium action blank ensures that young casters can feel the rod loading (that is if you can get them to slow down and “feel” the rod!).  At first, my son just started to wave the stick back and forth without regard for what the rod tip, and subsequently the line, was doing. This is probably something most youngsters will do at first, but giving them a good piece of hardware that isn’t a broomstick will greatly improve their casting once they get the hang of it. If you have kids you know that they like having their own stuff, so if a fly rod to call their own makes them more excited to get out there and use it, I’d say that’s a good thing.
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If you're going for small to medium sized freshwater fish, then your reel is going to have the primary function of holding and administering your line (and backing). Remember, the reel weight should be balanced with the rod; but don't worry, this can be easily achieved as rod and reel manufacturers include this information on their products. Once you go for bigger and stronger fish that take line off your reel, then you're going to need a good drag system that will enable you to stop them.
Whether it’s because you get a bite from the legendary monster fish that lurks in the depths of the old fishing hole or you just get your line caught on a log, it’s almost guaranteed that your fishing line will break or get tangled up during a fishing trip. Thus, it’s always good to have some extra line in your tackle box. The line you carry depends a great deal on where you’re fishing and what kind of fish you’re fishing for. If you’re fishing in rough conditions, you’ll want a heavier and more durable fishing line. This should help reduce the chances of snappage. If you’re fishing in a crystal clear lake, stealth is the key. So choose a thin, clear line to fake out the fish.
Pat, I think many people don’t realize that LL Bean is more than a clothing manufacturer and they actually make some pretty decent fly fishing gear. My first fly rod was made by Eddie Bauer, before all they did was make clothes. Good that your origins got you off on the right foot into a hopeless career of fly fishing! Hard to believe you’ve only been fishing for a year 😉

The old hook and worm should be enough for most of your fishing needs. But sometimes you’ll want to bust out some of the more complex lures in order to up your game. There are literally hundreds of types of fishing lures to choose from: spinners and spoons, minnow imitations, and top water lures to name a few. Each type of lure is designed to behave a certain way in the water in order to attract fish. For example, the minnow imitations are lures that look like small swimming minnows. Many medium- and large-sized fish like to munch on minnows, so it can be an effective lure. Spinners have a blade attached to them that creates a spinning action to attract fish. The type of lure you use is a matter of personal preference. Experiment to find what works for you and keep a few extra in your tackle box.
The Fishing Rod holds your Reel which in turn holds your line. A length of fishing line is threaded along a long, flexible rod or pole; one end terminates in a hook for catching the fish, while most of the rest of the line is wound around a reel at the base of the pole. The pulley-like arrangement of the reel allows the fish to be "reeled in" once caught.
These are a bit more finicky than the smallmouth, but they’re just as abundant. And according to most people, they’re the fish of choice for your dinner plate. Their soft, white, flaky flesh is delicious and you know what I’m talking about if you’ve enjoyed a meal in the past…..if you haven’t, you should read on to find out how to get these Northwood’s treasures into your camp frying pan. Early in spring right after ice out is when walleye spawn. During this time they can be caught pretty easily in shallow water on rocky points or gravel beds. They also school in moving water, so this is a place to focus on as well. For the first few weeks after the fishing opener, this is where you’ll find the walleye; but as the water warms and spring turns to early summer, they move out into deeper water around reefs and sunken islands out in the middle of the boundary waters lakes. You’ll find them anywhere between 15 and 40 feet in the summer depending on the weather and if it is overcast or not. But they always come up in the evenings and feed on reefs, rocky points around islands and drop-offs. You’ll find this to be the best time to fish walleye in 10 to 20 feet when the sun is dropping and as night is setting in. The ideal water temperature for walleyes is 65 degrees. Walleyes are more nocturnal because of their sensitivity to light. So don’t waste your time when the sun is high in the sky on a clear day….this is the time to go fish smallmouth or lake trout.
Packing for any trip can be time-consuming, or even stressful. When you’re out kayak fishing, it’s not so easy to run back to the house to grab a pair of pliers when you’ve already caught the fish. It’s important to use a kayak fishing gear list to make sure you don’t forget anything. In this guide, we’ll outline everything you need to take kayak fishing, from fishing gear to personal items.
The Gear List is ideally what you will pack.It is an “Essential Gear” list. The Essentials Gear List works for visitors & guides on 5-10 day back-country Alaskan float trips in June-July -Aug. All the clothing & gear would be appropriate for expeditionary fly fishing trips ranging from Patagonia, Argentina , to Scotland, New Zealand, to the Alaskan arctic and most of the clothing doubles as 4-season Steelhead fishing, backpacking, ski and snowboard clothing.
…Some quality wading boots. Simms’ Vibram wading boots are a tough, comfortable and safe option. They’re bombproof thanks to abrasion-resistant panels, and rubber treads paired with metal lugs give you grip on the slimiest of streambeds. What’s more, “cleanstream” technology keeps “hitch-hiking” organisms, which can latch onto your gear and find their way to non-native environments, causing some severe damage to ecosystems, from crashing your favorite stream’s party.
Sure, they’re expensive, but look at this as a two-for-one purchase. With a neck strap (which we definitely recommend), they’re a highly useful set of fishing sunglasses that are incredibly comfortable and lightweight thanks to tough semi-crystalline thermoplastic frame; when you’re off the water, they just make you look damn cool. You may wanna lose the camo neck strap when you’re cruising downtown, of course.
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That being said I wish some of the current kids’ fly rods were available when I started my own son out on his journey into fly fishing. He began by using a 9 foot 5wt graphite rod that had been relegated to backup status in my quiver rods. I was a bit hesitant to have him use this rod partially because it might’ve been a bit long for him to handle at first. But I’ll be honest:  my real hesitation lie in the fact that I was worried he’d break or otherwise trash my equipment! Fortunately my son has always had a knack for anything involving movements of the arm that resemble a throwing type motion (rocks, baseballs, etc).  He was always pretty coordinated as a youngster, and the basics of fly casting came fairly easily to him and my gear suffered no serious damage. He was 11 years old when he first went fly fishing with me, and while he could have done so earlier, I felt this was a perfect time to introduce him to the sport.  Maybe it was the perfect time for me to introduce him to the sport. He already liked fishing (catching, that is), and I felt that he had the patience to deal with the inevitable pitfalls of fly casting: line tangles.
Save money on quality fishing tackle shopping our clearance section. Looking for the best prices on fishing gear? This location is where anglers save money on fishing gear and accessories through our discounted fishing tackle bargains, closeout sale items and overstock price reductions! The product listed below are new; however, their packaging could be dated and/or damaged. Clearance specials are for in stock items only.
One of my oldest childhood memories is sitting out on a dock at the lake with my dad digging out a slimy worm from a muck-filled Styrofoam cup crawling with red wrigglers. Following a quick lesson on baiting a hook, I carefully impaled a worm and casted. Maybe 20 minutes later my rod bowed and my line began to pour off the reel. An epic tug-of-war between boy and gill-breathing pond creature ensued and roughly 20 seconds later I pulled up a bony sunfish. It was all of six inches, but to my eyes, it might as well have been a scale-tipping blue marlin. I succeeded because my dad was patient and clear. But also because he equipped me with the right kids fishing gear.
Modern rods are sophisticated casting tools fitted with line guides and a reel for line stowage. They are most commonly made of fibreglass, carbon fibre or, classically, bamboo. Fishing rods vary in action as well as length, and can be found in sizes between 24 inches and 20 feet. The longer the rod, the greater the mechanical advantage in casting. There are many different types of rods, such as fly rods, tenkara rods, spin and bait casting rods, spinning rods, ice rods, surf rods, sea rods and trolling rods.
Fishing EquipmentFirst and foremost, you should always pack for the type of fishing you'll be doing. The rods, reels and lines should match the type of fish you hope to catch.In addition to your primary fishing rod, pack a backup. If anything happens to your primary rod, you won't be forced to cut your trip short. Likewise, take an extra reel with you. You can use less expensive reels for your backups, but they still need to work well. Make sure all of the reels have been cleaned and the line is free from tangles.Take several spools of line with you. You never know what kinds of snags you'll encounter that might break your line. You'll also want a series of hooks, sinkers, swivels and corks. If you use artificial lures, take your favorites plus extras. If using live bait, you'll need bait buckets and coolers.You should have two tackle boxes. A small, compact box holds just the essentials. This can be pocket-sized or fit on your belt and it's the one you'll carry down to the water with you. Your large tackle box holds extra equipment and supplies, as well as any tools you want. This is the backup box that you can leave in the car.Other fishing equipment to pack
Bait is what you attach to the end of your line to attract the fish. The best option is usually live bait. Then again, different types of fish are attracted to different types of food. You should be all set with either of the two most common and effective live bait: worms and minnows (small freshwater fish). Other cheap options include grubs, corn, smooshed bread, marshmallows, or bits of hotdog.
A fish hook is a device for catching fish either by impaling them in the mouth or, more rarely, by snagging the body of the fish. Fish hooks have been employed for millennia by anglers to catch fresh and saltwater fish. Early hooks were made from the upper bills of eagles and from bones, shells, horns and thorns of plants (Parker 2002). In 2005, the fish hook was chosen by Forbes as one of the top twenty tools in the history of man.[2] Fish hooks are normally attached to some form of line or lure device which connects the caught fish to the angler. There is an enormous variety of fish hooks. Sizes, designs, shapes, and materials are all variable depending on the intended purpose of the hook. They are manufactured for a range of purposes from general fishing to extremely limited and specialized applications. Fish hooks are designed to hold various types of artificial, processed, dead or live baits (bait fishing); to act as the foundation for artificial representations of fish prey (fly fishing); or to be attached to or integrated into other devices that represent fish prey (lure fishing).
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