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Bobbers, or floaters as they’re sometimes called, help you know when you’re getting bites from a fish. When a fish bites, the bobber sinks. As soon as that happens, you know you’re ready to reel your catch in. Again, you have some choices when it comes to bobbers. The bobbers most people are familiar with are the round red and white plastic ones. The round bobbers are nice because you just have to clip them to the line in order to attach them. However, the round bobber does limit how deep you can cast a line.
The hook is what snags the fish so you can reel it in. Fishing hooks are designed to impale and imped in the mouth of a fish as it bites your bait. If the fish is unable to unhook itself, you can play it until it tires and then reel it in and gaff or net it. Fish hooks vary in design, size, shape and material depending, on what type of fish you are angling for.
Fishing nets are meshes usually formed by knotting a relatively thin thread. Between 177 and 180 the Greek author Oppian wrote the Halieutica, a didactic poem about fishing. He described various means of fishing including the use of nets cast from boats, scoop nets held open by a hoop, and various traps "which work while their masters sleep". Ancient fishing nets used threads made from leaves, plant stalk and cocoon silk. They could be rough in design and material but some designs were amazingly close to designs we use today (Parker 2002). Modern nets are usually made of artificial polyamides like nylon, although nets of organic polyamides such as wool or silk thread were common until recently and are still used.
Bait is what you attach to the end of your line to attract the fish. The best option is usually live bait. Then again, different types of fish are attracted to different types of food. You should be all set with either of the two most common and effective live bait: worms and minnows (small freshwater fish). Other cheap options include grubs, corn, smooshed bread, marshmallows, or bits of hotdog.
Encouraging youth fishing entails outfitting them with good kids fishing tackle and gear. Low-quality tackle that performs poorly or is difficult to use will only discourage them from hitting the water. Fortunately, the fishing world is flush with fine products perfect for furthering young anglers' careers. From rods and reels to tackle storage, eyewear, and electronics, you'll find items of interest to up-and-comers of all ages.

Packing for any trip can be time-consuming, or even stressful. When you’re out kayak fishing, it’s not so easy to run back to the house to grab a pair of pliers when you’ve already caught the fish. It’s important to use a kayak fishing gear list to make sure you don’t forget anything. In this guide, we’ll outline everything you need to take kayak fishing, from fishing gear to personal items.
When fishing in bright daylight, it can sometimes be difficult to see where the fish are as the sun can create a glare on the water’s surface. Make sure to bring a good pair of sunglasses, like the Dive Shades 100% UV Polarized Sunglasses ($42.95), which feature polarized lenses that allow you to see beneath the surface better and pinpoint where the fish are. At the same time, polarized sunglasses are designed to protect your eyes from the sun’s harmful UV rays.
One of my oldest childhood memories is sitting out on a dock at the lake with my dad digging out a slimy worm from a muck-filled Styrofoam cup crawling with red wrigglers. Following a quick lesson on baiting a hook, I carefully impaled a worm and casted. Maybe 20 minutes later my rod bowed and my line began to pour off the reel. An epic tug-of-war between boy and gill-breathing pond creature ensued and roughly 20 seconds later I pulled up a bony sunfish. It was all of six inches, but to my eyes, it might as well have been a scale-tipping blue marlin. I succeeded because my dad was patient and clear. But also because he equipped me with the right kids fishing gear.
These are a bit more finicky than the smallmouth, but they’re just as abundant. And according to most people, they’re the fish of choice for your dinner plate. Their soft, white, flaky flesh is delicious and you know what I’m talking about if you’ve enjoyed a meal in the past…..if you haven’t, you should read on to find out how to get these Northwood’s treasures into your camp frying pan. Early in spring right after ice out is when walleye spawn. During this time they can be caught pretty easily in shallow water on rocky points or gravel beds. They also school in moving water, so this is a place to focus on as well. For the first few weeks after the fishing opener, this is where you’ll find the walleye; but as the water warms and spring turns to early summer, they move out into deeper water around reefs and sunken islands out in the middle of the boundary waters lakes. You’ll find them anywhere between 15 and 40 feet in the summer depending on the weather and if it is overcast or not. But they always come up in the evenings and feed on reefs, rocky points around islands and drop-offs. You’ll find this to be the best time to fish walleye in 10 to 20 feet when the sun is dropping and as night is setting in. The ideal water temperature for walleyes is 65 degrees. Walleyes are more nocturnal because of their sensitivity to light. So don’t waste your time when the sun is high in the sky on a clear day….this is the time to go fish smallmouth or lake trout.

Another piece of tackle called a swivel comes in handy if you are using bait (like a minnow) or a lure (like a spinner) that has a twisting or turning action that tends to get your line twisted. Tie a swivel between your bait and your line. This will allow the bait or lure to spin without getting the line all tangled up. Swivels are inexpensive and come in various sizes to match the hooks and lures you might be using.
Knots are a fisherman’s nightmare and can be the end of a fishing trip. Most tangles and knots are caused by slack in the line while casting. The reduced length of a kids rod makes casting long distances impossible, but it also lessens the chances of line tangles for the same reason. The simple construction of children’s reels also lessens the chance for tangles and bad memories.
The Fishing Rod holds your Reel which in turn holds your line. A length of fishing line is threaded along a long, flexible rod or pole; one end terminates in a hook for catching the fish, while most of the rest of the line is wound around a reel at the base of the pole. The pulley-like arrangement of the reel allows the fish to be "reeled in" once caught.
Bait is what you attach to the end of your line to attract the fish. The best option is usually live bait. Then again, different types of fish are attracted to different types of food. You should be all set with either of the two most common and effective live bait: worms and minnows (small freshwater fish). Other cheap options include grubs, corn, smooshed bread, marshmallows, or bits of hotdog.
If your child has outgrown toddler fishing poles in terms of skill but is still physically too small for a standard adult rod, consider the Zebco Fishing Dock Demon Spinning Combo. Designed for vertical fishing in tight spaces, it’s geared towards adults but is also great for giving kids their first taste of a grown-up set-up. Made of solid Z-glass with an EVA foam handle, the 30-inch rod is both durable and lightweight. Reviewers say that kids as young as two can handle it without assistance.
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Like your bait and lure, you have several choices when it comes to bobbers. Traditional ones are made of cork with a stick in it so you can tie them to your line. The most popular and commonly used ones are the round red and white plastic ones, which are nice because they’re easy to attach to the line but can limit how deep you cast it. There are also those more elongated slip bobbers, which you can slide up and down the line and can help you get your hook deeper into the water.
Families who love to fish will know that there’s no greater pleasure than passing that passion down to the next generation. However, adult fishing rods are too heavy and unwieldy for little hands, and their complexity can lead to more frustration than fun. The best way to get children interested in fishing is to buy them their own, child-friendly rod. Kids’ fishing poles are typically short, light, inexpensive and simply designed. Look out for clever features such as no-tangle casting mechanisms and collapsible shafts; as well as budget-friendly packages that include a rod and tackle as well. 
When not in use, your child can keep their rod in the included sleek black carry case. Made from 600-denier Oxford fabric, it features convenient handles and a side pocket perfect for storing tackle, line and other fishing accessories. The package also includes an easy-to-use spincast reel, fishing line and a plastic cap that fits over the rod to protect the guide rings in transit. 
Harpoons are spears which have a barb at the end. Their use was widespread in palaeolithic times.[11] Cosquer cave in Southern France contains cave art over 16,000 years old, including drawings of seals which appear to have been harpooned. Tridents are spears which have three prongs at the business end. They are also called leisters or gigs. They feature widely in early mythology and history.

Bait is what you attach to the end of your line to attract the fish. The best option is usually live bait. Then again, different types of fish are attracted to different types of food. You should be all set with either of the two most common and effective live bait: worms and minnows (small freshwater fish). Other cheap options include grubs, corn, smooshed bread, marshmallows, or bits of hotdog.


Explore our collection of new fly-fishing gear and equipment. We carefully plan our designs and research every detail so you can maximize your fishing time and enjoy the best fishing gear money can buy. Discover the latest in a variety of fishing gear, including fly rods, fishing packs, waders, boats, wading boots, fly reels, and other gear. Let us help prepare you for your next fishing adventure—our selection of fishing gear has been engineered and tested by industry professionals to bring you only the best fishing products; shop with confidence knowing you're choosing from the best fly-fishing gear on the market.
Now that you know a little bit more about what we have, you can find the fishing tackle you need in our auction listings. Refine your search in a variety of ways and find the specific make and model of rod, reel and other pieces of equipment. Or, if you're looking to sell your own fishing tackle, take a look at your competition and get an idea for appropriate pricing. No matter what you decide to buy you can expect a smooth and safe transaction from GunBroker.com. With 15 years of excellence behind us we strive to offer the very best experience.
There are endless options when it comes to fly rods, but before purchasing one remember to think about matching the line weight you are going to need. Generally, 0 to 2 lines and rods are used for small trout and panfish; 3 to 5 lines and rods for bigger trout, small bass and longer casting distances; 6 and 7 lines and rods for bigger flies and fish as well as tougher wind conditions; 8 to 10 lines and rods are usually used for salmon, pike, steelhead, saltwater fly fishing and big heavy flies; and 11 to 14 lines and rods for heavy saltwater conditions and species, like GTs! Of course, these are just standards and they can change as the angler evolves and can vary according to each moment and spot, but these can be very useful for the ones just getting started in fly fishing.
The fishing line is tied to the tip of the pole and is cast with a simple swaying motion. A quick pull from the base of the pole acts a fulcrum, lifting the fish out of the water. This may seem antiquated but there is a new phenomenon called Tenkara fishing that involves using a pole made from space age materials just like you would a bamboo stick.
Now you are ready to set up your rod with hook, line, and sinker. Tie on a fish hook. Attach 1 or 2 sinkers, 6 to 12 inches above the hook. This weight will keep your bait or lure down in the water and will help swing it away from shore. A bobber lets you know when fish are biting, because it moves up and down in the water as fish nibble at the bait. Most bobbers attach to fishing line with a spring clip and move up and down the line easily, depending on how deep you want to fish the bait.
Similar to the Minnow, the Crosswater Youth Outfit was designed and tuned to meet the needs of a younger, beginner angler. However, this outfit is a little larger in size for the pre-teen/teen angler. The packaging and rod/reel case was designed to attract the teenage angler. The entire package is a legit fly angling package to a teen, but looks cool and “not like dad’s.”
When fishing, the most important tool to have on the water is a rod/pole. This acts as a lever, allowing the fisherman to play a fish and ultimately bring it to shore. Both words, rod, and pole are sometimes used interchangeably, many fishermen use both terms ubiquitously when describing their gear. There are differences, and if we dig deeper into the definitions, the contrast begins to make sense.
The Journey® youth series fly rod is the only fly rod designed for youth anglers, by youth anglers. Instead of taking an adult sized rod and trying to fit it into a youth sized package, we took everything we’ve learned from fishing with our own children and designed the Journey series from the ground up; arriving at what is arguably the finest youth fly rod ever built! The rod is a 4wt. design so it can be fished on most types of water, but the length is only 7’6″ so it is easy for a youth angler to control. In addition, the premium grade cork handle is crafted to perfectly fit a child’s hand and allow for comfortable casting without fatigue. This 4-piece rod series helps families to introduce their children to the sport of fly fishing with the right sized equipment, and without breaking the bank. The Journey series proprietary R-1 graphite design is a medium-fast action taper that is perfect for any casting style, and forgiving for those anglers just starting out. These are smooth casting rods that are sensitive, precise and effortless to cast; making it easier for youth anglers to learn the sport of fly fishing.
The Fishing Rod holds your Reel which in turn holds your line. A length of fishing line is threaded along a long, flexible rod or pole; one end terminates in a hook for catching the fish, while most of the rest of the line is wound around a reel at the base of the pole. The pulley-like arrangement of the reel allows the fish to be "reeled in" once caught.
I’ve broken the checklist down into three sections “Essential Fly Fishing Gear List”, “General Fly Fishing Gear Checklist” and “Optional”.  In the Essential Fly Fishing Checklist, I’ve included some reasoning for packing it.  Some items will seem obvious, but maybe I can give you some tidbits to think about when filling your fly fishing vest backpack.

Along with helping kids catch more fish and have more fun, buying them their own gear fuels a sense of ownership in their fishing success. Rather than borrowing someone else's equipment, being able to care for and bring to the water their personal fishing arsenal is priceless. With that in mind, we offer a selection of top gear for young guns. Some of it is designed specifically for youths, while other ageless items fit the youth market nicely on their own.
Based on these offerings from reputable manufacturers, young anglers don’t have to fish with junk equipment that’s little more than a colorful toy, and parents don’t have to break the bank to get quality gear for their kids.  Kids are the future of the sport, so get them away from their video games, get them a rod they’ll be thrilled to call their own, tie on a woolly bugger, and take ’em fishing! You’ll be glad you did, and so will they.
Fishing Line is another essential piece of equipment that plays a big role in Fishing. It is the cord connecting the Fish Hook to the Fishing Rod and Fishing Reel. Choosing the right kind of Fishing Line is as important as buying the appropriate Fishing Rod and Fishing Reel. The type of water where you will be fishing and the species which are probably living there must also be taken into consideration. Fishing Lines are commercially available in spools and vary in lengths, depending on how long you want your Fishing Line to be.
We get a lot of emails from anglers that are just getting into fly fishing asking us about the basic setup to get started in the sport. That's why we came up with this short list of essentials. Of course, there are lots of other elements to include as one progresses in fly fishing, but these are the basic tools that will help beginners catch their first fish on the fly.
Similar to the Minnow, the Crosswater Youth Outfit was designed and tuned to meet the needs of a younger, beginner angler. However, this outfit is a little larger in size for the pre-teen/teen angler. The packaging and rod/reel case was designed to attract the teenage angler. The entire package is a legit fly angling package to a teen, but looks cool and “not like dad’s.”
Today’s kids have a selection of quality offerings specifically geared toward the younger angler. Something shorter than the “standard” 9 footer can make a rod more manageable in the hands of a child, and a medium action blank ensures that young casters can feel the rod loading (that is if you can get them to slow down and “feel” the rod!).  At first, my son just started to wave the stick back and forth without regard for what the rod tip, and subsequently the line, was doing. This is probably something most youngsters will do at first, but giving them a good piece of hardware that isn’t a broomstick will greatly improve their casting once they get the hang of it. If you have kids you know that they like having their own stuff, so if a fly rod to call their own makes them more excited to get out there and use it, I’d say that’s a good thing.
The rod comes with a removable spinning reel, pre-loaded with a six-pound line. The open-faced design allows for better accuracy and distance than your average child-friendly spincast reel, and is ideal for teaching your kid a more sophisticated casting technique. With the included six-pound line, the reel has a maximum capacity of 135 yards - enough to fight and land larger species than one would usually target with a kids’ fishing pole.

What You Should Look For:  Whether you’re big-game bonefishing in the Bahamas or trolling for crappie in Wisconsin, you’ll need a pair of fishing pliers to save you a whole lot of grief when unhooking catches and they also come in handy for securing hooks to tighten knots and to cut lines. Go for pliers that fit nicely in the palm of your hands with jaws suitable for both fresh and saltwater usage.
Other devices which are widely used as bite indicators are floats which float in the water, and dart about if a fish bites, and quiver tips which are mounted onto the tip of the fishing rod. Bite alarms are electronic devices which bleep when a fish tugs a fishing line. Whereas floats and quiver tips are used as visual bite detectors, bite alarms are audible bite detectors.
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