Mark’s Wild River trips will take you far beyond where the lodge jet boats operate. To get there we will load a high performance float plane with the correct type of raft and camp and fly fishing gear and the proper amount of supplies. We weigh each angler and piece of gear on electronic scales before loading the airplane. You can bring a maximum of fifty pounds #50. This includes your clothing, waders, boots, rods & reels, Gore-Tex rain jacket, spare tackle, camera etc. Experienced Alaska anglers generally have less than #35 pounds of gear.
The Journey® youth series fly rod is the only fly rod designed for youth anglers, by youth anglers. Instead of taking an adult sized rod and trying to fit it into a youth sized package, we took everything we’ve learned from fishing with our own children and designed the Journey series from the ground up; arriving at what is arguably the finest youth fly rod ever built! The rod is a 4wt. design so it can be fished on most types of water, but the length is only 7’6″ so it is easy for a youth angler to control. In addition, the premium grade cork handle is crafted to perfectly fit a child’s hand and allow for comfortable casting without fatigue. This 4-piece rod series helps families to introduce their children to the sport of fly fishing with the right sized equipment, and without breaking the bank. The Journey series proprietary R-1 graphite design is a medium-fast action taper that is perfect for any casting style, and forgiving for those anglers just starting out. These are smooth casting rods that are sensitive, precise and effortless to cast; making it easier for youth anglers to learn the sport of fly fishing.
A fishing reel is a device used for the deployment and retrieval of a fishing line using a spool mounted on an axle. Fishing reels are traditionally used in angling. They are most often used in conjunction with a fishing rod, though some specialized reels are mounted on crossbows or to boat gunwales or transoms. The earliest known illustration of a fishing reel is from Chinese paintings and records beginning about 1195 A.D. Fishing reels first appeared in England around 1650 A.D., and by the 1760s, London tackle shops were advertising multiplying or gear-retrieved reels. Paris, Kentucky native George Snyder is generally given credit for inventing the first fishing reel in America around 1820, a bait casting design that quickly became popular with American anglers.
That being said I wish some of the current kids’ fly rods were available when I started my own son out on his journey into fly fishing. He began by using a 9 foot 5wt graphite rod that had been relegated to backup status in my quiver rods. I was a bit hesitant to have him use this rod partially because it might’ve been a bit long for him to handle at first. But I’ll be honest:  my real hesitation lie in the fact that I was worried he’d break or otherwise trash my equipment! Fortunately my son has always had a knack for anything involving movements of the arm that resemble a throwing type motion (rocks, baseballs, etc).  He was always pretty coordinated as a youngster, and the basics of fly casting came fairly easily to him and my gear suffered no serious damage. He was 11 years old when he first went fly fishing with me, and while he could have done so earlier, I felt this was a perfect time to introduce him to the sport.  Maybe it was the perfect time for me to introduce him to the sport. He already liked fishing (catching, that is), and I felt that he had the patience to deal with the inevitable pitfalls of fly casting: line tangles.

Hopefully you won’t have any major medical emergencies while you’re fishing. But small injuries are likely to happen, like getting a hook caught in your thumb or falling down and getting scraped up. For these sorts of things, it’s good to have a small first aid kit on hand. It doesn’t have to be fancy. Just throw in some band-aids, Neosporin, a few small bandages, and some waterproof medical tape. That should take care of most fishing-related injuries.
The Fishing Rod holds your Reel which in turn holds your line. A length of fishing line is threaded along a long, flexible rod or pole; one end terminates in a hook for catching the fish, while most of the rest of the line is wound around a reel at the base of the pole. The pulley-like arrangement of the reel allows the fish to be "reeled in" once caught.
Now you are ready to set up your rod with hook, line, and sinker. Tie on a fish hook. Attach 1 or 2 sinkers, 6 to 12 inches above the hook. This weight will keep your bait or lure down in the water and will help swing it away from shore. A bobber lets you know when fish are biting, because it moves up and down in the water as fish nibble at the bait. Most bobbers attach to fishing line with a spring clip and move up and down the line easily, depending on how deep you want to fish the bait.
While all rods on this list include a reel and various accessories, the Lanaak Kids Fishing Rod Combo Kit incorporates everything your child could need for a fun-filled day by the water. As well as a telescoping rod and spincast reel, this 47-piece set includes a minnow net, a beginner’s guide to fishing and a tackle box with equipment to suit all occasions.

Like any other Fishing equipment, Fishing Reels are very important in almost any Fishing adventure. A Fishing Reel is a frame like a spool which turns on an axis, for winding the Fishing Line. It is attached on the bottom part of some Fishing Rods and on the top of others. You can read more about that by visiting Our Reels Page.  Fishing Reels keep the excess Fishing Line on the spool, release line during Casting, and take back the line at a handle's turn.
This is the best website I have ever seen for starters this really taught me a lot about fishing today I learned about fishing tackle how to handle bass and about fishing tips and pretty much everything a good starter needs to know about to start a great one or two or maybe three years of fishing!🙂🎣ya so thanks for making this beautiful website so that is all I have to say so thanks anyway bye.🎣🐟🏆🏅😊
Picture the setting. Early morning light only strong enough to create a light band against the horizon. The mist rises off a slowly moving river before you. In your hand is the contemporary version of an ancient tool: the fishing rod. You spy the likely area where your quarry should be and give the rod a heave, the unspooling line barely interrupting the morning’s peace. And splash, the bait is in the water. You crank the reel. Pause. Crank. Pause. Crank. Strike. A thrill shoots through your soul as you react to set the hook and the fish fights for its life doing its best to drag you into the water with it. The strike hit like a boxer’s uppercut. And if the fish turns out to be as big as the fight, then this would definitely be a trophy.
What You Should Look For:  Whether you’re big-game bonefishing in the Bahamas or trolling for crappie in Wisconsin, you’ll need a pair of fishing pliers to save you a whole lot of grief when unhooking catches and they also come in handy for securing hooks to tighten knots and to cut lines. Go for pliers that fit nicely in the palm of your hands with jaws suitable for both fresh and saltwater usage.
It all depends on the species you will be going after during your early days in fly fishing, but a small selection of classic patterns should be enough to get you started. If you're going for trout, consider taking a small assortment of nymphs, dries and streamers so as to cover the main bases. A good tip: visit your local fly shop to find the hot flies of your area.
At L.L. Bean, we’ve always been committed to introducing newcomers to the sport of fly fishing – in the easiest and most affordable way possible. Our Angler Fly Rod Outfit comes loaded with backing, a floating line and a leader – just tie on a fly, and in minutes you’re ready to fish. We worked closely with both beginning fly casters and our Fly-Fishing School instructors to develop a smooth medium-action rod that makes it easy for anyone to learn the graceful art of fly casting. A quality composite reel with a click and pawl drag and high-quality graphite ensure that you, your kids and your grandkids can learn from the same outfit. Includes handy rod carrying tube for storage and transport. Imported.
Remember that each rod is designed for a specific line weight, and line weight is also up to the angler's personal preference. (Check the fly rod section on our buying guide for more information about line weight.) Fly Line is what presents the fly during the cast. Lines come in a lot of options, from floating to sinking, and in different types of taper.

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Packing for any trip can be time-consuming, or even stressful. When you’re out kayak fishing, it’s not so easy to run back to the house to grab a pair of pliers when you’ve already caught the fish. It’s important to use a kayak fishing gear list to make sure you don’t forget anything. In this guide, we’ll outline everything you need to take kayak fishing, from fishing gear to personal items.

Whether it’s because you get a bite from the legendary monster fish that lurks in the depths of the old fishing hole or you just get your line caught on a log, it’s almost guaranteed that your fishing line will break or get tangled up during a fishing trip. Thus, it’s always good to have some extra line in your tackle box. The line you carry depends a great deal on where you’re fishing and what kind of fish you’re fishing for. If you’re fishing in rough conditions, you’ll want a heavier and more durable fishing line. This should help reduce the chances of snappage. If you’re fishing in a crystal clear lake, stealth is the key. So choose a thin, clear line to fake out the fish.
Fishing EquipmentFirst and foremost, you should always pack for the type of fishing you'll be doing. The rods, reels and lines should match the type of fish you hope to catch.In addition to your primary fishing rod, pack a backup. If anything happens to your primary rod, you won't be forced to cut your trip short. Likewise, take an extra reel with you. You can use less expensive reels for your backups, but they still need to work well. Make sure all of the reels have been cleaned and the line is free from tangles.Take several spools of line with you. You never know what kinds of snags you'll encounter that might break your line. You'll also want a series of hooks, sinkers, swivels and corks. If you use artificial lures, take your favorites plus extras. If using live bait, you'll need bait buckets and coolers.You should have two tackle boxes. A small, compact box holds just the essentials. This can be pocket-sized or fit on your belt and it's the one you'll carry down to the water with you. Your large tackle box holds extra equipment and supplies, as well as any tools you want. This is the backup box that you can leave in the car.Other fishing equipment to pack
That being said I wish some of the current kids’ fly rods were available when I started my own son out on his journey into fly fishing. He began by using a 9 foot 5wt graphite rod that had been relegated to backup status in my quiver rods. I was a bit hesitant to have him use this rod partially because it might’ve been a bit long for him to handle at first. But I’ll be honest:  my real hesitation lie in the fact that I was worried he’d break or otherwise trash my equipment! Fortunately my son has always had a knack for anything involving movements of the arm that resemble a throwing type motion (rocks, baseballs, etc).  He was always pretty coordinated as a youngster, and the basics of fly casting came fairly easily to him and my gear suffered no serious damage. He was 11 years old when he first went fly fishing with me, and while he could have done so earlier, I felt this was a perfect time to introduce him to the sport.  Maybe it was the perfect time for me to introduce him to the sport. He already liked fishing (catching, that is), and I felt that he had the patience to deal with the inevitable pitfalls of fly casting: line tangles.
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The reel’s simple design is ideally suited to teaching young kids to cast. It’s less complex than a baitcaster and less prone to line twists and tangles than a traditional open-faced spinning reel. The 5.2:1 gear ratio gives budding anglers just the right blend of power and speed. The combo also comes with fishing line and tackle, including a selection of crankbaits, float bobbers, jig heads, soft lures, swivels and sinkers suited to a range of different fishing situations. A tackle box is also offered for an additional fee.
The coho fishing started strong and just continued to strengthen, peaking by the hour. There was a session with Jim Bean at "Porpoise Flats" that goes down as the BEST 90 minutes of fishing in my life bar none. Really large silvers on every cast, we spent most of the time doubled up. I'm fairly certain there were no two happier people on the planet at that moment. Bob Erickson
One of my oldest childhood memories is sitting out on a dock at the lake with my dad digging out a slimy worm from a muck-filled Styrofoam cup crawling with red wrigglers. Following a quick lesson on baiting a hook, I carefully impaled a worm and casted. Maybe 20 minutes later my rod bowed and my line began to pour off the reel. An epic tug-of-war between boy and gill-breathing pond creature ensued and roughly 20 seconds later I pulled up a bony sunfish. It was all of six inches, but to my eyes, it might as well have been a scale-tipping blue marlin. I succeeded because my dad was patient and clear. But also because he equipped me with the right kids fishing gear.
Bobbers, or floaters as they’re sometimes called, help you know when you’re getting bites from a fish. When a fish bites, the bobber sinks. As soon as that happens, you know you’re ready to reel your catch in. Again, you have some choices when it comes to bobbers. The bobbers most people are familiar with are the round red and white plastic ones. The round bobbers are nice because you just have to clip them to the line in order to attach them. However, the round bobber does limit how deep you can cast a line.
Kids and adults use the same basic techniques while fishing but their gear is different. Teaching children to fish is time-consuming and must be done correctly. If a child has a bad experience, they will most likely never want to do it again. Children's rods are built to mitigate negative experiences and maximize the catching of fish. This is done by eliminating most moving parts and keeping the size of the rod and reel small.
Whether you're going deep sea fishing or just to your local lake, a tackle box is a must-have item. Tackle boxes allow you to store all of the essentials you need for your fishing adventure, including hooks, artificial baits and lures, fishing line, needle-nose pliers, line cutter, fillet knife, sinkers and bobbers. Tackle boxes have several small compartments in trays on the top where you can neatly separate all the small items you're taking with you. There's also space at the bottom for larger items. If you have the room, you may want to consider placing in your tackle box a first aid kit small flashlight, insect repellent, sunscreen and fishing gloves.
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