The use of the hook in angling is descended, historically, from what would today be called a "gorge". The word "gorge", in this context, comes from an archaic word meaning "throat". Gorges were used by ancient peoples to capture fish. A gorge was a long, thin piece of bone or stone attached by its midpoint to a thin line. The gorge would be fixed with a bait so that it would rest parallel to the lay of the line. When a fish swallowed the bait, a tug on the line caused the gorge to orient itself at right angles to the line, thereby sticking in the fish's gullet.
Anglers know that a lot goes into a successful day on the boat, at the lake or on the shore. Everything from weather conditions, wind speed and time of day can play a role in how many fish you land. In addition to fishing in the right spot under the right conditions, you need great bait and lures. Here are some tips to help you catch a delicious dinner:
Sustenance is another important thing to remember on any fishing trip. There’s a reason most airlines serve small bags of peanuts on even the shortest of flights – it’s because most of us can’t go a couple of hours without getting hangry. Forgetting food and water on a fishing trip can be deadly. Below is a list of items to bring on a day trip (approximately 8 hours). Pack a small cooler bag with an ice pack and store it out of the sun in one of your kayak’s storage areas.
When you’re fishing great weather in the summer, many conditions allow for wet wading. This is prime. Who doesn’t want to be kept cool while they enjoy the beauty of a limestone creek or a favorite pond? That said, you should get a quality pair of waders for when the weather isn’t so nice or the water’s bigger than your bare gams can handle. Orvis’s Enduras (in either hip- or chest-length) are tough, light and comfortable. We recommend the stockingfoot version, in which case you’ll need…
Whether it’s because you get a bite from the legendary monster fish that lurks in the depths of the old fishing hole or you just get your line caught on a log, it’s almost guaranteed that your fishing line will break or get tangled up during a fishing trip. Thus, it’s always good to have some extra line in your tackle box. The line you carry depends a great deal on where you’re fishing and what kind of fish you’re fishing for. If you’re fishing in rough conditions, you’ll want a heavier and more durable fishing line. This should help reduce the chances of snappage. If you’re fishing in a crystal clear lake, stealth is the key. So choose a thin, clear line to fake out the fish.
When you’re fishing great weather in the summer, many conditions allow for wet wading. This is prime. Who doesn’t want to be kept cool while they enjoy the beauty of a limestone creek or a favorite pond? That said, you should get a quality pair of waders for when the weather isn’t so nice or the water’s bigger than your bare gams can handle. Orvis’s Enduras (in either hip- or chest-length) are tough, light and comfortable. We recommend the stockingfoot version, in which case you’ll need…
Sustenance is another important thing to remember on any fishing trip. There’s a reason most airlines serve small bags of peanuts on even the shortest of flights – it’s because most of us can’t go a couple of hours without getting hangry. Forgetting food and water on a fishing trip can be deadly. Below is a list of items to bring on a day trip (approximately 8 hours). Pack a small cooler bag with an ice pack and store it out of the sun in one of your kayak’s storage areas.
When not in use, your child can keep their rod in the included sleek black carry case. Made from 600-denier Oxford fabric, it features convenient handles and a side pocket perfect for storing tackle, line and other fishing accessories. The package also includes an easy-to-use spincast reel, fishing line and a plastic cap that fits over the rod to protect the guide rings in transit. 
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Another piece of tackle called a swivel comes in handy if you are using bait (like a minnow) or a lure (like a spinner) that has a twisting or turning action that tends to get your line twisted. Tie a swivel between your bait and your line. This will allow the bait or lure to spin without getting the line all tangled up. Swivels are inexpensive and come in various sizes to match the hooks and lures you might be using.
If you're going for small to medium sized freshwater fish, then your reel is going to have the primary function of holding and administering your line (and backing). Remember, the reel weight should be balanced with the rod; but don't worry, this can be easily achieved as rod and reel manufacturers include this information on their products. Once you go for bigger and stronger fish that take line off your reel, then you're going to need a good drag system that will enable you to stop them.
Fishing nets are meshes usually formed by knotting a relatively thin thread. Between 177 and 180 the Greek author Oppian wrote the Halieutica, a didactic poem about fishing. He described various means of fishing including the use of nets cast from boats, scoop nets held open by a hoop, and various traps "which work while their masters sleep". Ancient fishing nets used threads made from leaves, plant stalk and cocoon silk. They could be rough in design and material but some designs were amazingly close to designs we use today (Parker 2002). Modern nets are usually made of artificial polyamides like nylon, although nets of organic polyamides such as wool or silk thread were common until recently and are still used.
Packing for any trip can be time-consuming, or even stressful. When you’re out kayak fishing, it’s not so easy to run back to the house to grab a pair of pliers when you’ve already caught the fish. It’s important to use a kayak fishing gear list to make sure you don’t forget anything. In this guide, we’ll outline everything you need to take kayak fishing, from fishing gear to personal items.
What You Should Look For:  Whether you’re big-game bonefishing in the Bahamas or trolling for crappie in Wisconsin, you’ll need a pair of fishing pliers to save you a whole lot of grief when unhooking catches and they also come in handy for securing hooks to tighten knots and to cut lines. Go for pliers that fit nicely in the palm of your hands with jaws suitable for both fresh and saltwater usage.
Create memorable fishing experiences with the incredible selection of equipment and accessories at Academy. From rods, reels, and baits to storage, care, and apparel, we have fishing gear you need to stay prepared. Facing unpredictable weather or getting up close in the water? Shop our assortment of apparel and waders that will help keep you dry and comfortable. Go high-tech with various fish-finding equipment that can help you track and secure the best catch. We also offer practical fishing equipment like lights, fish processing tools, nets, baskets, grippers, bait traps, and other miscellaneous tools you'll want on hand. Whether you're a casual fisher or an avid adventurer, you'll be able to find the exact things you need to make the most of your fishing expedition. Create the best memories with family and friends, or take to the great outdoors by yourself. No matter your fishing style, there's something for you. Shop our diverse collection today to find high-quality products from brands you can trust.
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