Sustenance is another important thing to remember on any fishing trip. There’s a reason most airlines serve small bags of peanuts on even the shortest of flights – it’s because most of us can’t go a couple of hours without getting hangry. Forgetting food and water on a fishing trip can be deadly. Below is a list of items to bring on a day trip (approximately 8 hours). Pack a small cooler bag with an ice pack and store it out of the sun in one of your kayak’s storage areas.

Sure, they’re expensive, but look at this as a two-for-one purchase. With a neck strap (which we definitely recommend), they’re a highly useful set of fishing sunglasses that are incredibly comfortable and lightweight thanks to tough semi-crystalline thermoplastic frame; when you’re off the water, they just make you look damn cool. You may wanna lose the camo neck strap when you’re cruising downtown, of course.
Bass are pound for pound the best fighting fish in canoe country which is why they are so popular among anglers all over the country, and especially in the boundary waters. Bass become more and more active as the water warms and the temperatures increase. They spawn in very warm shallow bays and are very protective of their beds. Ideally they like to spawn in water temperatures of about 58 to 62 degrees. So usually by early to mid June the Bass really start hitting top water lures thrown into the shallow bays that warm the fastest. And the smallmouth stay active all summer long and are your best bet if you’re looking for some action during those hot summer days. Evenings can also produce some fantastic action in the shallows… it pays to eat dinner early and then go out from your campsite to enjoy the “night bite”.
If you're going for small to medium sized freshwater fish, then your reel is going to have the primary function of holding and administering your line (and backing). Remember, the reel weight should be balanced with the rod; but don't worry, this can be easily achieved as rod and reel manufacturers include this information on their products. Once you go for bigger and stronger fish that take line off your reel, then you're going to need a good drag system that will enable you to stop them.
The swivel sinker is similar to the plain one, except that instead of loops, there are swivels on each end to attach the line. This is a decided improvement, as it prevents the line from twisting and tangling. In trolling, swivel sinkers are indispensable. The slide sinker, for bottom fishing, is a leaden tube which allows the line to slip through it, when the fish bites. This is an excellent arrangement, as the angler can feel the smallest bite, whereas in the other case the fish must first move the sinker before the angler feels him.
It all depends on the species you will be going after during your early days in fly fishing, but a small selection of classic patterns should be enough to get you started. If you're going for trout, consider taking a small assortment of nymphs, dries and streamers so as to cover the main bases. A good tip: visit your local fly shop to find the hot flies of your area.
Bobbers, or floaters as they’re sometimes called, help you know when you’re getting bites from a fish. When a fish bites, the bobber sinks. As soon as that happens, you know you’re ready to reel your catch in. Again, you have some choices when it comes to bobbers. The bobbers most people are familiar with are the round red and white plastic ones. The round bobbers are nice because you just have to clip them to the line in order to attach them. However, the round bobber does limit how deep you can cast a line.
Fish finders, marine radios, and flashers are also available for the diehard anglers. There’s no such thing as having too much of an advantage. Navigate the lake on the prowl for another big trophy catch. The latest up-to-date maps and GPS chartplotting are just two more features that help turn your typical day on the water into a fish fest worthy of bragging about.
×