One of my oldest childhood memories is sitting out on a dock at the lake with my dad digging out a slimy worm from a muck-filled Styrofoam cup crawling with red wrigglers. Following a quick lesson on baiting a hook, I carefully impaled a worm and casted. Maybe 20 minutes later my rod bowed and my line began to pour off the reel. An epic tug-of-war between boy and gill-breathing pond creature ensued and roughly 20 seconds later I pulled up a bony sunfish. It was all of six inches, but to my eyes, it might as well have been a scale-tipping blue marlin. I succeeded because my dad was patient and clear. But also because he equipped me with the right kids fishing gear.
Today’s kids have a selection of quality offerings specifically geared toward the younger angler. Something shorter than the “standard” 9 footer can make a rod more manageable in the hands of a child, and a medium action blank ensures that young casters can feel the rod loading (that is if you can get them to slow down and “feel” the rod!).  At first, my son just started to wave the stick back and forth without regard for what the rod tip, and subsequently the line, was doing. This is probably something most youngsters will do at first, but giving them a good piece of hardware that isn’t a broomstick will greatly improve their casting once they get the hang of it. If you have kids you know that they like having their own stuff, so if a fly rod to call their own makes them more excited to get out there and use it, I’d say that’s a good thing.
There are endless options when it comes to fly rods, but before purchasing one remember to think about matching the line weight you are going to need. Generally, 0 to 2 lines and rods are used for small trout and panfish; 3 to 5 lines and rods for bigger trout, small bass and longer casting distances; 6 and 7 lines and rods for bigger flies and fish as well as tougher wind conditions; 8 to 10 lines and rods are usually used for salmon, pike, steelhead, saltwater fly fishing and big heavy flies; and 11 to 14 lines and rods for heavy saltwater conditions and species, like GTs! Of course, these are just standards and they can change as the angler evolves and can vary according to each moment and spot, but these can be very useful for the ones just getting started in fly fishing.
If you're going for small to medium sized freshwater fish, then your reel is going to have the primary function of holding and administering your line (and backing). Remember, the reel weight should be balanced with the rod; but don't worry, this can be easily achieved as rod and reel manufacturers include this information on their products. Once you go for bigger and stronger fish that take line off your reel, then you're going to need a good drag system that will enable you to stop them.
Important parameters of a fishing line are its breaking strength and its diameter (thicker, sturdier lines are more visible to fish). Factors that may determine what line an angler chooses for a given fishing environment include breaking strength, diameter,castability, buoyancy, stretch, color, knot strength, UV resistance, limpness, abrasion resistance, and visibility.
  Echo Gecko , fly fishing books , fly fishing gear for kids , fly fishing rods for children , fly rods for kids , Lealand Sonoma Emerger , LL Bean Angler , Olive and the Big Stream , Olive Goes for a Wild Ride , Olive the Little Woolly Bugger , Orvis Streamline , Redington Crosswater , Redington Crosswater Youth outfit , Redington Minnow , Ross Journey , Scientific Angler Trout fly fishing starter kit , take kids fly fishing
If you plan to fish by the shore, small tackle boxes that can fit in your bag may be enough. When bank fishing, just bring one small tackle box as it would be easier to carry than having to drag around a large one. You’ll likely need to update your box with the appropriate fishing tackles for each of your trips in order to be able to bring a small box.

When not in use, your child can keep their rod in the included sleek black carry case. Made from 600-denier Oxford fabric, it features convenient handles and a side pocket perfect for storing tackle, line and other fishing accessories. The package also includes an easy-to-use spincast reel, fishing line and a plastic cap that fits over the rod to protect the guide rings in transit. 

Ross takes the perfect approach to an affordable fly fishing reel: low maintenance, high performance. It’s finished aluminum alloy with a drag (that’s what provides pressure when line is being pulled out by you or a fish) that will last, providing a backup reel once you decide to move up the gear ladder. Again, it’s ubiquitous, pairing with any rod 2wt to 9wt, salt or freshwater.


I also like the open faced reel included as many kids rods use a push button reel instead. The open face tangles less frequently and it teaches the kid how to fish using the same technology as the person teaching them. Teaching a young child to cast with an open face reel can be rewarding because of how far the lure can be thrown. It even comes with line pre-spooled, making it dummy proof.
The simplicity of the product is what makes it appealing. At 12 feet long, it is ample enough to reach those hard to get places. The ability to break it down into 3 parts means it can be used for kids as well. If its length makes it too unwieldy for your child to hold, simply forego the final piece to shorten its length. Another benefit to this product is that the fishing line, hook, and float and all included. The product can be used for fishing the moment it arrives, saving time when packing the car to go fishing.
While all rods on this list include a reel and various accessories, the Lanaak Kids Fishing Rod Combo Kit incorporates everything your child could need for a fun-filled day by the water. As well as a telescoping rod and spincast reel, this 47-piece set includes a minnow net, a beginner’s guide to fishing and a tackle box with equipment to suit all occasions.

Fishing traps are culturally almost universal and seem to have been independently invented many times. There are essentially two types of trap, a permanent or semi-permanent structure placed in a river or tidal area and pot-traps that are baited to attract prey and periodically lifted. They might have the form of a fishing weir or a lobster trap. A typical trap can have a frame of thick steel wire in the shape of a heart, with chicken wire stretched around it. The mesh wraps around the frame and then tapers into the inside of the trap. When a fish swims inside through this opening, it cannot get out, as the chicken wire opening bends back into its original narrowness. In earlier times, traps were constructed of wood and fibre.
The first consideration you should make when selecting a fishing rod is length. If you're trying to catch smaller fish using light tackle, a shorter rod is in order. If you're surf fishing and trying to cast your line far offshore, or if you're trolling for bigger fish while on a moving boat, a longer rod is what you need. However, when fishing for fighting fish or other sea life, such as sharks, a shorter, thicker rod is the right choice it gives you better control when trying to land your catch. Longer rods also work better when you're fly fishing in a stream or river.
×