If you're going for small to medium sized freshwater fish, then your reel is going to have the primary function of holding and administering your line (and backing). Remember, the reel weight should be balanced with the rod; but don't worry, this can be easily achieved as rod and reel manufacturers include this information on their products. Once you go for bigger and stronger fish that take line off your reel, then you're going to need a good drag system that will enable you to stop them.
The first consideration you should make when selecting a fishing rod is length. If you're trying to catch smaller fish using light tackle, a shorter rod is in order. If you're surf fishing and trying to cast your line far offshore, or if you're trolling for bigger fish while on a moving boat, a longer rod is what you need. However, when fishing for fighting fish or other sea life, such as sharks, a shorter, thicker rod is the right choice it gives you better control when trying to land your catch. Longer rods also work better when you're fly fishing in a stream or river.
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Anglers know that a lot goes into a successful day on the boat, at the lake or on the shore. Everything from weather conditions, wind speed and time of day can play a role in how many fish you land. In addition to fishing in the right spot under the right conditions, you need great bait and lures. Here are some tips to help you catch a delicious dinner:
Fishing tackle boxes have for many years been an essential part of the anglers equipment. Fishing tackle boxes were originally made of wood or wicker and eventually some metal fishing tackle boxes were manufactured. The first plastic fishing tackle boxes were manufactured by Plano in response to the need for a product that didn't rust. Early plastic fishing tackle boxes were similar to tool boxes but soon evolved into the hip roof cantilever tackle boxes with numerous small trays for small tackle. These types of tackle boxes are still available today but they have the disadvantage that small tackle gets mixed up. Fishing tackle boxes have also been manufactured so the drawers themselves become small storage boxes, each with their own lids. This prevents small tackle from mixing, and can turn each drawer into a stand-alone container which can be used to carry small tackle to a rod some distance from the main tackle box.
The most important thing with fishing is to be confident with the method and the area in which you are fishing. If you get a bad feeling that a certain technique or area you are fishing in isn’t going to produce, try something new or move to a different spot. Many tips and techniques can be learned from fishing magazines and books. And you should consider reading some before you come on your trip as it will help you understand what the fish are looking for and it will give you the best possible opportunity to catch your limit and have a great time on your boundary waters adventure. The same techniques will work on most all of the different lakes. Look for similar structure from lake to lake and follow the wind, always follow the wind. With this you’ll do well in any lake.

Whether it’s because you get a bite from the legendary monster fish that lurks in the depths of the old fishing hole or you just get your line caught on a log, it’s almost guaranteed that your fishing line will break or get tangled up during a fishing trip. Thus, it’s always good to have some extra line in your tackle box. The line you carry depends a great deal on where you’re fishing and what kind of fish you’re fishing for. If you’re fishing in rough conditions, you’ll want a heavier and more durable fishing line. This should help reduce the chances of snappage. If you’re fishing in a crystal clear lake, stealth is the key. So choose a thin, clear line to fake out the fish.
Ross takes the perfect approach to an affordable fly fishing reel: low maintenance, high performance. It’s finished aluminum alloy with a drag (that’s what provides pressure when line is being pulled out by you or a fish) that will last, providing a backup reel once you decide to move up the gear ladder. Again, it’s ubiquitous, pairing with any rod 2wt to 9wt, salt or freshwater.
If you're not using live bait or cut bait, you'll want to use artificial bait or lures. Most artificial lures resemble the type of bait fish or other food, such as worms or shrimp, that the fish you're trying to catch normally eat. These artificial baits can be scented and have metal spoons attached to them or be painted in metal flake to reflect light in the water. Other types of bait include jigs and jig heads, spoons, flies and spinnerbaits, which you can attach artificial or real bait to, and attractants to make artificial lures smell lifelike.
Available in Hello Kitty or Paw Patrol-inspired designs, the 29-inch rod also telescopically folds to just 17 inches for easy transport. The attached spincast reel comes with a six-pound line already spooled and has a gear ratio of 3.1:1. The combo also includes a casting plug (so that your child can master the basics at home), a snap swivel and a safety hook. The latter is barbless, so there’s no chance of hooked fingers ruining your day out.
One of the most popular options on Amazon, the PLUSINNO Kids Fishing Pole Combo includes almost everything you need to introduce your little one to the sport. The highlight is the telescopic fishing rod, which measures 3.94 feet in length and weighs just 2.2 ounces. It features a non-slip EVA foam handle that’s just the right size for little hands; and folds down into a compact 14.5-inch package perfect for storing in the toy cupboard back home. The combo also includes a spincast reel, which can be mounted for right or left-hand use.
From ice fishing to a salt water excursion, your gear matters, so find top quality fishing gear for your trip at OpticsPlanet. Serious fishermen require the most powerful reels, the perfect rod, and the right lures to find the fish they want. Whether you prefer freshwater or saltwater fishing, the right hooks and tools ensure that you don't miss out on that prize winning fish you've been eager to catch. Prefer fly fishing or ice fishing? We have all the gear you need there too, including ice skimmers, fishing waders, dry bags and more. With brands you trust like Laser Sharp, Penn, Vexilar, and more, you'll find the highest quality fishing equipment at prices that won't break the bank. Trolling motors and fish finders will get you to the fish, so pick one up today and start seeing all that lies below the surface. Not quite sure where to begin, or heading out on your first fishing trip? We have a large selection of starter rods and fishing books, but you can also find extra guidance from our Fishing Guides. These how-to guides can help you find the perfect rod and reel for your next adventure. Still lost? Our product specialists are standing by to answer all of your questions and steer you towards fishing choices that you'll love.
Leaders are either monafilament or wire that is more abrasion-resistant and heavier than fishing line alone. The leader connects the end of the line to the bait and hook. It's used to protect your fishing line and help prevent it from breaking -- or being bitten in half -- while you reel in larger fish. A leader is not always necessary, and it typically is used only when there is concern that a fish will create enough force to snap your line.

Bait is what you attach to the end of your line to attract the fish. The best option is usually live bait. Then again, different types of fish are attracted to different types of food. You should be all set with either of the two most common and effective live bait: worms and minnows (small freshwater fish). Other cheap options include grubs, corn, smooshed bread, marshmallows, or bits of hotdog.
You'll need a pair of waders to access the best fishing locations on the water. The most common waders are stockingfoot, which are used with wading shoes and are ideal for hiking and longer fishing days. You'll also find bootfoot waders, which are designed for making getting in and out of the water quick and convenience. For more details about this must-have piece of fly fishing gear, check out our waders buying guide.
When fishing in bright daylight, it can sometimes be difficult to see where the fish are as the sun can create a glare on the water’s surface. Make sure to bring a good pair of sunglasses, like the Dive Shades 100% UV Polarized Sunglasses ($42.95), which feature polarized lenses that allow you to see beneath the surface better and pinpoint where the fish are. At the same time, polarized sunglasses are designed to protect your eyes from the sun’s harmful UV rays.
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Based on these offerings from reputable manufacturers, young anglers don’t have to fish with junk equipment that’s little more than a colorful toy, and parents don’t have to break the bank to get quality gear for their kids.  Kids are the future of the sport, so get them away from their video games, get them a rod they’ll be thrilled to call their own, tie on a woolly bugger, and take ’em fishing! You’ll be glad you did, and so will they.
The old hook and worm should be enough for most of your fishing needs. But sometimes you’ll want to bust out some of the more complex lures in order to up your game. There are literally hundreds of types of fishing lures to choose from: spinners and spoons, minnow imitations, and top water lures to name a few. Each type of lure is designed to behave a certain way in the water in order to attract fish. For example, the minnow imitations are lures that look like small swimming minnows. Many medium- and large-sized fish like to munch on minnows, so it can be an effective lure. Spinners have a blade attached to them that creates a spinning action to attract fish. The type of lure you use is a matter of personal preference. Experiment to find what works for you and keep a few extra in your tackle box.

Knots are a fisherman’s nightmare and can be the end of a fishing trip. Most tangles and knots are caused by slack in the line while casting. The reduced length of a kids rod makes casting long distances impossible, but it also lessens the chances of line tangles for the same reason. The simple construction of children’s reels also lessens the chance for tangles and bad memories.
Teaching a child to fish can be one of the most rewarding aspects of parenting. There are plenty of products on the market that will facilitate this process. Taking a kid fishing can feel overwhelming but having a basic understanding of poles and rods will help. It is up to you to choose the right combo, but as long as the kid is fishing, then something is going right.
I also like the open faced reel included as many kids rods use a push button reel instead. The open face tangles less frequently and it teaches the kid how to fish using the same technology as the person teaching them. Teaching a young child to cast with an open face reel can be rewarding because of how far the lure can be thrown. It even comes with line pre-spooled, making it dummy proof.
The coho fishing started strong and just continued to strengthen, peaking by the hour. There was a session with Jim Bean at "Porpoise Flats" that goes down as the BEST 90 minutes of fishing in my life bar none. Really large silvers on every cast, we spent most of the time doubled up. I'm fairly certain there were no two happier people on the planet at that moment. Bob Erickson
Stock your tackle box with a variety of hooks so you’re ready for any sort of fish. I like to stick with the traditional J-hook, but many fishermen swear by the french hook. No matter what type of hook you carry, make sure you have them in different sizes. You don’t want to fish for river trout using a hook that’s sized for a 120-pound catfish. Sizes range from the very smallest at a number 32, to the very largest at 19/0.

The bad news is that all together this kit still costs a pretty penny. The good news is that you don’t need to get it all right now. If money is an issue, start out with the absolute essentials: rod, reel, fly line, leaders, tippet and flies. In the summer on smaller streams, you can always wade wet (it’s pretty refreshing, actually); a vest should be next on your list, but you can get by without it as long as you stay simple; a hat and polarized sunglasses can wait a payday or two.
Pat, I think many people don’t realize that LL Bean is more than a clothing manufacturer and they actually make some pretty decent fly fishing gear. My first fly rod was made by Eddie Bauer, before all they did was make clothes. Good that your origins got you off on the right foot into a hopeless career of fly fishing! Hard to believe you’ve only been fishing for a year 😉

Speaking of safety, one last thing you absolutely shouldn’t forget is extra protection for your skin. Even if you’re well-covered by clothing, slather or spray on a sun-protectant formula—like the Sun Bum SPF 70 Continuous Spray Sunscreen 6 fl. oz ($15.99)—on all exposed skin areas, especially if you’re going to be fishing out in the sun all day. Make sure your sunscreen tube is small so it can fit in your tackle box and you’ll be reminded to put it on whenever you head out to fish.
If casting rods are more your speed, check out the wide selection of poles with advanced technology. The powerful yet sensitive rods allow you to detect steelhead and rainbow salmon the instant they nibble on your bait. And, with features like corrosion resistant stainless steel, aluminum oxide inserts, and specialized grips, you’re guaranteed top-of-the-line performance.
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