A sinker or plummet is a weight used when angling to force the lure or bait to sink more rapidly or to increase the distance that it may be cast. The ordinary plain sinker is traditionally made of lead. It can be practically any shape, and is often shaped round like a pipe-stem, with a swelling in the middle. However, the use of smaller lead based fishing sinkers has now been banned in the UK, Canada and some states in the USA,[4] since lead can cause toxic lead poisoning if ingested. There are loops of brass wire on either end of the sinker to attach the line. Weights can range from a quarter of an ounce for trout fishing up to a couple of pounds or more for sea bass and menhaden.

Natalie has loved all things nature since she was a child and found at an early age that writing is the best way for her to convey her personal experiences colorfully. She hopes to inspire others to not only enjoy this amazing earth we live on, but to protect it at all costs. She owns a soap company called Pop Cauldron and enjoy songwriting, rock climbing, and spending time outside with her cats, Reginald, Hamilton, and Josephine.
OUTERGARMENTS: Waterproof rain jacket, preferable lightweight and packable. Always carry this with you! Fishing specific Gortex or similar products are best. Layer for changing weather conditions. We recommend quick-drying synthetic materials such as polyester, nylon, etc. Even though you may be visiting in summer it’s always a good idea to include a good fleece jacket or similar wind-blocking product. Long-sleeved, quick drying fishing shirts, pants and shorts. Gloves and stocking cap just in case.
We recommend using an 8-wt or 9-wt. 9' rod with both floating WF and WF rapid sink tip lines with 20 - 30 lb. test backing (the same outfit may be used for Trout and Northern). Use a 14 - 18 lb. test tapered leader/tippet, and wire leaders are essential. With floating lines you may wish to use a fly line one size up from the rod weight-an 8-wt. rod uses a 9-wt. line.
The term tackle, with the meaning "apparatus for fishing", has been in use from 1398 AD.[1] Fishing tackle is also called fishing gear. However the term fishing gear is more usually used in the context of commercial fishing, whereas fishing tackle is more often used in the context of recreational fishing. This article covers equipment used by recreational anglers.
Fish finders, marine radios, and flashers are also available for the diehard anglers. There’s no such thing as having too much of an advantage. Navigate the lake on the prowl for another big trophy catch. The latest up-to-date maps and GPS chartplotting are just two more features that help turn your typical day on the water into a fish fest worthy of bragging about.
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