The EVA split grip is specially designed for smaller hands. The rod breaks down into two pieces for easy transport and storage and includes a spinning reel with a sturdy anodized aluminum spool and one ball bearing for smoother casting and retrieval. You can adapt the handle to suit right or left-handed users. With a six-pound line, the reel has a maximum capacity of 145 yards. This increases to 255 yards when using lighter found-pound line. 

Fishing with a hook and line is called angling. In addition to the use of the hook and line used to catch a fish, a heavy fish may be landed by using a landing net or a hooked pole called a gaff. Trolling is a technique in which a fishing lure on a line is drawn through the water. Snagging is a technique where the object is to hook the fish in the body.

The most important thing with fishing is to be confident with the method and the area in which you are fishing. If you get a bad feeling that a certain technique or area you are fishing in isn’t going to produce, try something new or move to a different spot. Many tips and techniques can be learned from fishing magazines and books. And you should consider reading some before you come on your trip as it will help you understand what the fish are looking for and it will give you the best possible opportunity to catch your limit and have a great time on your boundary waters adventure. The same techniques will work on most all of the different lakes. Look for similar structure from lake to lake and follow the wind, always follow the wind. With this you’ll do well in any lake.
Fishing rods consist of a slender pole made of strong but pliable materials. When combined with a fishing line and reel, the rod allows you to cast your line far into the water. Rods vary depending on what type of fishing you plan on doing and typically are classified by their action (how far it bends), strength (power), taper and responsiveness. Rods typically are made from graphite or fiberglass.
Man with lake troutThese fish inhabit the colder, deeper waters and sometimes aren’t as easily caught. But if fished correctly can provide quite a fight and a good dinner to boot. The trout are always willing to bite your line, but getting the baits in front of their face is often times the hardest part in fishing lake trout. During the spring when the water temperature is all the same throughout the lake, trout can be caught in depths as shallow as five feet. But that only lasts a few weeks after ice out. They look for water temperatures of about 46 or 48 degrees. So during the summer months, trout can be found in depths of anywhere between 50 and 100 feet. Trout hang out on steep structure where they can have access to the deep water. So focus on sharp drop-offs.
One of the easier fish to catch, especially in the spring time. They like to sun themselves in shallow, warmer bays in the spring. As the summer goes on they go a bit deeper as well, but you can catch them all year long by casting baits towards shore. You’ll often catch northern while bass and walleye fishing. They can be a nuisance if you aren’t fishing for them specifically because they can bite you’re line off if you don’t have a leader on. But never fish with a leader if you aren’t specifically fishing for northern. These are also an excellent tasting fish, but many people throw them back because they have a set of “Y” bones that are a bit more difficult to fillet around, but if done properly, northern can rival walleye in the tasting category.

Lots of people are turned off of fly fishing by a few glances at ugly price tags, but there’s plenty of accessibility to be had. A good many of us got around the up-front expenses buying an all-in-one package or kit, but while some nice ones do exist, there are also loads of “outfits” that package shoddy products; in our experience, those will simply add to your beginner’s frustrations.
Your vest will be your portable HQ. It’s the outward symbol of your fishing personality, really: anal and perfectly organized, jumbled and haphazard, smelling of maduros or even with a whiskey stain where your flask leaked. Extremely light but with more than enough storage, Fishpond’s vest is festooned with bonuses like a tippet dispenser pocket, gear attachment tabs, cord loops and shoulder straps for all-day comfort.
A hook and worm alone are too light to sink very deeply. You’ll need to attach a weight or “sinker” to your fishing rig in order to compensate for that. I’ve lost plenty of sinkers on fishing expeditions so it’s good to have some extras on hand. Sinkers are traditionally made of lead, but some states are beginning to outlaw the use of lead sinkers for environmental reasons. It wouldn’t surprise me if the this trend continues. Other options for sinker materials are brass, tungsten, steel, and bismuth.
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With our huge selection of fishing gear, Cheaper Than Dirt! is sure to be able to outfit you for that dream fishing trip or a short jaunt down to the neighborhood pond. We have a full selection of baits, tackle, rods, reels, line, and even waders. We have the same equipment in stock that the pros use and the fishing clothing to make you look like one as well!
If you're not using live bait or cut bait, you'll want to use artificial bait or lures. Most artificial lures resemble the type of bait fish or other food, such as worms or shrimp, that the fish you're trying to catch normally eat. These artificial baits can be scented and have metal spoons attached to them or be painted in metal flake to reflect light in the water. Other types of bait include jigs and jig heads, spoons, flies and spinnerbaits, which you can attach artificial or real bait to, and attractants to make artificial lures smell lifelike.
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