A sinker or plummet is a weight used when angling to force the lure or bait to sink more rapidly or to increase the distance that it may be cast. The ordinary plain sinker is traditionally made of lead. It can be practically any shape, and is often shaped round like a pipe-stem, with a swelling in the middle. However, the use of smaller lead based fishing sinkers has now been banned in the UK, Canada and some states in the USA,[4] since lead can cause toxic lead poisoning if ingested. There are loops of brass wire on either end of the sinker to attach the line. Weights can range from a quarter of an ounce for trout fishing up to a couple of pounds or more for sea bass and menhaden.
Today’s kids have a selection of quality offerings specifically geared toward the younger angler. Something shorter than the “standard” 9 footer can make a rod more manageable in the hands of a child, and a medium action blank ensures that young casters can feel the rod loading (that is if you can get them to slow down and “feel” the rod!).  At first, my son just started to wave the stick back and forth without regard for what the rod tip, and subsequently the line, was doing. This is probably something most youngsters will do at first, but giving them a good piece of hardware that isn’t a broomstick will greatly improve their casting once they get the hang of it. If you have kids you know that they like having their own stuff, so if a fly rod to call their own makes them more excited to get out there and use it, I’d say that’s a good thing.
While I’m a big fan of using live bait, it’s always good to have a package of plastic worms in your tackle box, especially if you’re bass fishing. Plastic worms come in a variety of colors and sizes. The worms with the long tails are probably the easiest to use. Some fishermen swear that certain colors of plastic worms will increase the number of bites. It’s probably a superstitious belief, but if you’ve had luck with a certain color plastic worm, you might as well keep using it.
A fishing rod is an additional tool used with the hook, line and sinker. A length of fishing line is attached to a long, flexible rod or pole: one end terminates with the hook for catching the fish. Early fishing rods are depicted on inscriptions in ancient Egypt, China, Greece and Rome. In Medieval England they were called angles (hence the term angling). As they evolved they were made from materials such as split Tonkin bamboo, Calcutta reed, or ash wood, which were light, tough, and pliable. The butts were frequently made of maple. Handles and grips were made of cork, wood, or wrapped cane. Guides were simple wire loops.
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The term tackle, with the meaning "apparatus for fishing", has been in use from 1398 AD.[1] Fishing tackle is also called fishing gear. However the term fishing gear is more usually used in the context of commercial fishing, whereas fishing tackle is more often used in the context of recreational fishing. This article covers equipment used by recreational anglers.
Packing well is always a challenge and having the right fly fishing gear is essential to having a successful trip. Please refer to our fly fishing checklist before you bring a pile of unnecessary fly fishing gear. We’ve done this for a while, and we know how important some of your fly fishing gear is to you. But save yourself the stress and pack efficiently by keeping in mind that you don’t need to bring it all.
Fishing Line is another essential piece of equipment that plays a big role in Fishing. It is the cord connecting the Fish Hook to the Fishing Rod and Fishing Reel. Choosing the right kind of Fishing Line is as important as buying the appropriate Fishing Rod and Fishing Reel. The type of water where you will be fishing and the species which are probably living there must also be taken into consideration. Fishing Lines are commercially available in spools and vary in lengths, depending on how long you want your Fishing Line to be.
Leaders are either monafilament or wire that is more abrasion-resistant and heavier than fishing line alone. The leader connects the end of the line to the bait and hook. It's used to protect your fishing line and help prevent it from breaking -- or being bitten in half -- while you reel in larger fish. A leader is not always necessary, and it typically is used only when there is concern that a fish will create enough force to snap your line.
 Cut a piece of fishing line as long as the pole. Tie the line to the tip of the pole and a hook to the other end of the line. A small sinker, called a "split shot", is squeezed onto the line above the hook. The sinker makes it easier to swing the bait out into the water and keeps the bait under the water surface. You may also want to use a bobber or float. By moving the bobber up or down the line, you can change the depth of your bait in the water.

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Packing for any trip can be time-consuming, or even stressful. When you’re out kayak fishing, it’s not so easy to run back to the house to grab a pair of pliers when you’ve already caught the fish. It’s important to use a kayak fishing gear list to make sure you don’t forget anything. In this guide, we’ll outline everything you need to take kayak fishing, from fishing gear to personal items.

A fishing reel is a device used for the deployment and retrieval of a fishing line using a spool mounted on an axle. Fishing reels are traditionally used in angling. They are most often used in conjunction with a fishing rod, though some specialized reels are mounted on crossbows or to boat gunwales or transoms. The earliest known illustration of a fishing reel is from Chinese paintings and records beginning about 1195 A.D. Fishing reels first appeared in England around 1650 A.D., and by the 1760s, London tackle shops were advertising multiplying or gear-retrieved reels. Paris, Kentucky native George Snyder is generally given credit for inventing the first fishing reel in America around 1820, a bait casting design that quickly became popular with American anglers.

OUTERGARMENTS: Waterproof rain jacket, preferable lightweight and packable. Always carry this with you! Fishing specific Gortex or similar products are best. Layer for changing weather conditions. We recommend quick-drying synthetic materials such as polyester, nylon, etc. Even though you may be visiting in summer it’s always a good idea to include a good fleece jacket or similar wind-blocking product. Long-sleeved, quick drying fishing shirts, pants and shorts. Gloves and stocking cap just in case.
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Make your outdoor ventures easier with Fishing Clearance. Spending time outside brings friends and families together, and gives you the opportunity to get some fresh air while staying active. Enjoy nature and quality time with those you care about with the wide selection offered here. We have the essential gear plus accessories for your adventure. Ditch the TV binge-marathons and screen time this season and get excited for downtime activities in line with a healthy lifestyle. Interesting, cool activities await and we've got the gear to get you and the family ready.
Fish finders, marine radios, and flashers are also available for the diehard anglers. There’s no such thing as having too much of an advantage. Navigate the lake on the prowl for another big trophy catch. The latest up-to-date maps and GPS chartplotting are just two more features that help turn your typical day on the water into a fish fest worthy of bragging about.
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