One of the easier fish to catch, especially in the spring time. They like to sun themselves in shallow, warmer bays in the spring. As the summer goes on they go a bit deeper as well, but you can catch them all year long by casting baits towards shore. You’ll often catch northern while bass and walleye fishing. They can be a nuisance if you aren’t fishing for them specifically because they can bite you’re line off if you don’t have a leader on. But never fish with a leader if you aren’t specifically fishing for northern. These are also an excellent tasting fish, but many people throw them back because they have a set of “Y” bones that are a bit more difficult to fillet around, but if done properly, northern can rival walleye in the tasting category.
Whether you're going deep sea fishing or just to your local lake, a tackle box is a must-have item. Tackle boxes allow you to store all of the essentials you need for your fishing adventure, including hooks, artificial baits and lures, fishing line, needle-nose pliers, line cutter, fillet knife, sinkers and bobbers. Tackle boxes have several small compartments in trays on the top where you can neatly separate all the small items you're taking with you. There's also space at the bottom for larger items. If you have the room, you may want to consider placing in your tackle box a first aid kit small flashlight, insect repellent, sunscreen and fishing gloves.

The coho fishing started strong and just continued to strengthen, peaking by the hour. There was a session with Jim Bean at "Porpoise Flats" that goes down as the BEST 90 minutes of fishing in my life bar none. Really large silvers on every cast, we spent most of the time doubled up. I'm fairly certain there were no two happier people on the planet at that moment. Bob Erickson
The rod comes with a removable spinning reel, pre-loaded with a six-pound line. The open-faced design allows for better accuracy and distance than your average child-friendly spincast reel, and is ideal for teaching your kid a more sophisticated casting technique. With the included six-pound line, the reel has a maximum capacity of 135 yards - enough to fight and land larger species than one would usually target with a kids’ fishing pole.
Anglers know that a lot goes into a successful day on the boat, at the lake or on the shore. Everything from weather conditions, wind speed and time of day can play a role in how many fish you land. In addition to fishing in the right spot under the right conditions, you need great bait and lures. Here are some tips to help you catch a delicious dinner:
Like your bait and lure, you have several choices when it comes to bobbers. Traditional ones are made of cork with a stick in it so you can tie them to your line. The most popular and commonly used ones are the round red and white plastic ones, which are nice because they’re easy to attach to the line but can limit how deep you cast it. There are also those more elongated slip bobbers, which you can slide up and down the line and can help you get your hook deeper into the water.
Leaders are either monafilament or wire that is more abrasion-resistant and heavier than fishing line alone. The leader connects the end of the line to the bait and hook. It's used to protect your fishing line and help prevent it from breaking -- or being bitten in half -- while you reel in larger fish. A leader is not always necessary, and it typically is used only when there is concern that a fish will create enough force to snap your line.
What You Should Look For:  Whether you’re big-game bonefishing in the Bahamas or trolling for crappie in Wisconsin, you’ll need a pair of fishing pliers to save you a whole lot of grief when unhooking catches and they also come in handy for securing hooks to tighten knots and to cut lines. Go for pliers that fit nicely in the palm of your hands with jaws suitable for both fresh and saltwater usage.
Choosing the right rod for you should depend on the kind of fishing you’re going to do. If you’re just starting out, use a rod with medium strength so that you can angle different kinds of fish, and enough responsiveness so you can easily feel when the fish bite—allowing you to quickly reel it out of the water. The ideal length of a rod should be around 11.8 inches (30 centimeters) longer than your height.
If casting rods are more your speed, check out the wide selection of poles with advanced technology. The powerful yet sensitive rods allow you to detect steelhead and rainbow salmon the instant they nibble on your bait. And, with features like corrosion resistant stainless steel, aluminum oxide inserts, and specialized grips, you’re guaranteed top-of-the-line performance.
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